Cats Ears Are Hot

When you stroke your pet cat, you could notice that their ears are unusually warm. This might be concerning, especially if you’ve never observed it before. Is the heat in your cat’s ears normal? After all, how much thought have you given to your cat’s ears’ temperature?

First of all, cats are inherently warm animals whose body temperatures are a few degrees higher than those of humans. In light of this, it is very normal for your cat’s ears to be warmer than you might anticipate. However, if your cat’s ears are significantly hotter than usual, you should be concerned since this might be a sign of more serious health problems.

This article will examine possible causes and remedies for your cat’s ears being warmer than usual. Let’s get going!

Facts on cat ears and temperature

The first thing to understand when you think, “My cat’s ears are hot,” is that cat ears vary in temperature depending on the animal’s environment, which is entirely normal. Cat ears often have little to no fur or body fat covering them, unlike the majority of the surface area of a cat’s body. They are infamous for changing their noses as well.

Vasodilation boosts blood flow to these places during hotter months of the year, which helps the body shed more heat. Vasoconstriction works the other way to keep heat in during cooler weather.

You would believe that indoor cats are solely affected by the thermostat’s whims, but any cat sat next to a window during the day will notice a brief rise in ear and nose temperature.

Our baseline perception of warmth differs significantly from our cats’ perceptions of warmth if we consider colorpoint breeds like the Siamese. These breeds in particular have physical evidence of their experience with heat.

You may be aware that all members of these breeds are born with white coats and that the distinctive coat markings of color-pointed cats are manifestations of a type of partial albinism. The patches of color appear as the cats become older, and the coldest regions of their bodies, usually their ears, noses, and tails, are where they are darkest.

Do warm ears indicate illness?

Most cat owners’ immediate natural response to hot cat ears is a fever; after all, an increase in body temperature in humans typically denotes a fever, which is the body’s method of fending off sickness.

Even if there is a fever brought on by an underlying ailment, there is typically little cause for alarm and no need to take your pet right away to the clinic. A slight sickness or infection can cause your cat to develop a fever, and you’ll probably notice your cat sleeping in cooler places.

If your cat also exhibits additional symptoms, such as an inability to feed, lethargy, or body heat in other areas, there may be a more severe issue at hand.

If the areas behind your cat’s arms and tummy are also unusually warm, your cat most certainly has a fever. Please bring your cat to the veterinarian clinic in this situation.

There can be a more serious health problem that requires the attention of a vet if this higher than usual fever is accompanied by signs like fast breathing, decreased grooming, decreased hunger, and decreased drinking.

Is It Normal for a Cat to Have Hot Ears?

Hot ears are not only an accident of evolution in cats. Your cat may actively defend itself against the cold by using them. Just like the rest of the cat, the ears are sensitive to temperature variations. Indeed, there isn’t much fur or fat on the ears. The thin tissue is hence significantly more susceptible to these alterations.

Cats’ ears frequently vasodilate during warm weather and constrict during the winter months. Vasodilation happens when the blood vessels widen, allowing more blood to move throughout the body and dissipate internal heat.

Vasoconstriction is the process by which the blood vessels close in order to keep heat in the most vital areas of your cat’s body. Specifically, this is the head and torso.

In essence, your cat’s ears should feel warm if their vasospasm is vasodilated and significantly colder if it is vasoconstricted. By doing this, your cat may run about in chilly temperatures without injuring its ears. Additionally, if your cat sunbathes under a cozy window, it can help it avoid overheating.

As a result, it is recommended to feel your cat’s ears when it is napping in the sun. You could still notice that the cat’s ears are warm, but they aren’t hot or burning like they would be feverish. It may be an indication of heatstroke if your cat’s ears feel very warm and it is panting.

Hot cat ears and fevers of unknown origin

Cats with viral illnesses may experience fevers that pass as rapidly as they arrived. Fevers brought on by secondary bacterial infections are typically accompanied by visible wounds or, if they are internal, by abnormally swollen regions.

Your cat may develop a disease known as a fever of unknown cause if it has displayed feverish symptoms four or more times in the span of two weeks. Take particular note of any and all changes, including the first time you detected hot cat ears. This includes behavioral, physical, and other changes. In this manner, your veterinarian can start the challenging process of diagnosing the issue.

What about infections?

Whether your cat’s ears are hot, you might be wondering if they have an infection of any sort. It’s crucial to remember that viral illnesses can come and go fast, but fevers brought on by bacterial infections frequently coincide with a visible lesion, damage, or swelling if the infection is internal.

Accordingly, if your cat has a viral illness, you shouldn’t worry too much because your cat’s immune system will likely take care of it in a day or two.

However, if this fever persists for more than 3 or 4 days and is accompanied by the symptoms listed above, a vet visit is required. Bacterial infections frequently include other symptoms, such as swelling or an injury, and are typically simple to identify.

Warmer ears in your cat might indicate an ear infection of some sort or even ear mites, according to anecdotal evidence. The majority of the time, bacterial ear infections are straightforward to identify and nearly always come with other symptoms like swelling or an injury.

However, your cat’s frequent scratching and rubbing is more likely to blame for this temperature increase. Last but not least, a build-up of earwax or an external obstruction can obstruct airflow and perhaps result in an infection that elevates the temperature of your cat’s ear.

Once more, this won’t just be isolated warmth; it will also be accompanied with redness, swelling, your cat’s continual fussing, and maybe even discharge.

There is proof that if your cat is too anxious, their ears may feel warm to the touch. This could result from moving into a new home, bringing a new pet into the family, or any other significant changes.

Reasons for Hot Cat Ears

Why are the ears on my cat hot? You need not always be concerned if your cat’s ears feel warm to the touch. In actuality, the first potential reason could be plain to see.

It seems sense that this area of your cat’s body could feel warmer than normal if they have been sleeping sprawled out in the sun or near to the fireplace. We need to consider the context of why a cat’s ears are heated in order to determine whether the issue is pathological or environmental.

When faced with difficulties, cats can be reserved, frequently hiding when ill. We can find the problem if we are aware of both the typical feline behaviors and the unique traits of our individual cat. They may consist of:

Cats Just Run Hot

True, a cat’s normal body temperature ranges from 101.0 to 102.5 degrees Fahrenheit, which is many degrees warmer than that of a person. This higher body temperature may assist to explain why cats obnoxiously lie in the sun or in your warm, freshly laundered clothes.

Therefore, it is totally normal for a cat’s ears to feel warm or hot to a colder, human touch if your cat isn’t displaying any other symptoms.

Illness

One of the compelling causes of cats’ hot ears is illness. It is quite natural for a human body temperature to increase while they are ill; this symptom is known as a fever.

The same is true for cats as well. It is normal for your cat’s body temperature to rise when she is unwell. The presence of a fever is a reliable sign of your cat’s health. There might be an underlying illness affecting your cat.

Being a cat owner requires you to be very perceptive. You should judge the intensity of the heat when you touch your cat’s ears.

You shouldn’t be extremely alarmed if your cat has a somewhat warm body temperature. However, if the heat is extreme, you should consult your veterinarian.

Feline fever symptoms are an indication that the cat is making an effort to fend off the illness’s root cause. Therefore, it’s not necessarily a negative thing if the temperature of your cat’s ears rises.

Exposure to a heat source

As we said before, it’s possible that your cat was merely relaxing close to a heater, such the sun or a radiator. Cats enjoy the sun and other heat sources because convection transfers heat, warming a chilly body.

Due to their own body heat, they can even raise the temperature while curled up in a ball with their paws covering their ears. If this is the case, you will see that as soon as the ears are removed from the heat source, they quickly cool.

our Cat Is Regulating Her Body Temperature

Cats have ears that are useful for producing aircraft ears in addition as listening. They also assist in controlling body temperature.

If your cat has been lying in the sun for the day, it’s likely that she’s releasing body heat through her ears since they are packed with small veins that constrict in cold situations to retain heat or expand in hot environments to release heat. If you boop her little nose, you could also notice that it’s warm.

If your cat has colder ears throughout the winter, she’s probably simply trying to keep her body warm, so don’t be frightened. Give your cat a warm blanket or heated cat bed if you suspect she might be too chilly. Keep in mind that compared to your former desert-dwelling cat, we humans can tolerate cooler temperatures better.

Infections

Cats’ ears are delicate and prone to infection. The outer ear and inner ear make up the majority of a cat’s ear. These two are both susceptible to infection at any time. Cat ear infections frequently result from the following:

If an ear infection is not treated right away, it may permanently harm the ears.

You should keep a close eye out for other, more subtle symptoms, including increased ear scratching and head shaking, as a cat owner.

Ear infections in cats can be brought on by both bacteria and viruses. There are, however, some distinctions between the two.

Usually, a fever brought on by bacteria is accompanied by an apparent injury or inflammation. High-grade fever brought on by germs.

If bacteria are not treated, the heat or fever they induce can linger for several days. However, a viral illness resolves in one to two days.

In conclusion, bacterial infections are often more serious than viral illnesses.

Your Cat Has a Fever

Fever is among the most often cited causes of hot ears in cats. The immunological system of a cat causes an increase in body temperature, which may be controlled by the ears. However, a diagnosis of fever may only be made once a precise temperature measurement is recorded. For additional information, see our guide to taking a cat’s temperature.

Your Cat Has Ear Mites

Ear mites will drive your cat crazy and lead her to scratch, paw, and rub her ears against anything in sight, making her ears heated in the process. They are most frequent in kittens and outdoor cats. She may also shake her head, and you may see the inflammation and black spots on the skin inside her ear.

If left untreated, ear mites do not go away on their own, can result in secondary illnesses, and are very communicable to other dogs. Therefore, it is recommended to take your cat to the doctor if you believe that she has ear mites. (Banfield Pet Hospital also advises against using DIY ear mite treatments on your cat; they are just not safe to do so.)

Heatstroke
One of the typical indicators of heatstroke in cats is hot ears. Cats cannot react to heat in the same way that humans can.

Due to the presence of sweat glands in practically every area of our body, humans can readily handle heat. However, cats only have a small number in their nose and feet.

Cats primarily regulate their body temperature by panting and cooling from the outside. Cats are particularly prone to heatstroke because of their lengthy fur coats.

Unlike outdoor cats, indoor cats find it difficult to dissipate heat, which causes their body temperatures to be higher than normal.

Provide your cat with a well-ventilated space where she can cool off to prevent heatstroke. Additionally, make sure your cat has access to clean water to drink.

Heatstroke

One of the typical indicators of heatstroke in cats is hot ears. Cats cannot react to heat in the same way that humans can.

Due to the presence of sweat glands in practically every area of our body, humans can readily handle heat. However, cats only have a small number in their nose and feet.

Cats primarily regulate their body temperature by panting and cooling from the outside. Cats are particularly prone to heatstroke because of their lengthy fur coats.

Unlike outdoor cats, indoor cats find it difficult to dissipate heat, which causes their body temperatures to be higher than normal.

Provide your cat with a well-ventilated space where she can cool off to prevent heatstroke. Additionally, make sure your cat has access to clean water to drink.